USDA Assistance To Those Impacted By Hurricane

posted by Karla James - 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture  reminds rural communities, farmers and ranchers, families and small businesses in the path of Hurricane Harvey that USDA has programs that provide assistance before, during and after disasters. USDA staff in the regional, State and county offices in Texas and Louisiana are ready to help.

“American farmers and ranchers can handle adversity, and USDA is here with resources so they don’t have to go it alone. Our thoughts and prayers are with those preparing for Hurricane Harvey to make landfall, and USDA stands with them and is ready to assist in any way we can. We have USDA employees in every county in this nation, and our people can help with a variety of services that may be useful in natural disasters like this one," said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue.

USDA’s Operations Center is activated 24/7 keeping the Secretary and USDA’s leadership team informed. An Incident Management Team stood up today and will remain in effect thorough the incident. USDA has important roles in both response and recovery to hurricanes and stands ready to support the American people who rely on it each day.

In a continuing effort to better serve the public, USDA partnered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and other disaster-focused organizations and created the Disaster Resources Center  website. This central source of information utilizes a searchable knowledgebase of disaster-related resources that are powered by agents with subject-matter expertise. The new Disaster Resource Center website and web tool now provide an easy access point to find USDA disaster information and assistance.

USDA also encourages residents and small businesses in the potential impact zones to contact the following offices to meet their individual needs:

Property and Shelter

When floods destroy or severely damage residential property, USDA Rural Development can assist with providing priority hardship application processing for single family housing. If a disaster designation is declared, USDA, USDA Rural Development can issue a priority letter for next available multi-family housing units. While these programs do not normally have disaster assistance authority, many of USDA Rural Development programs can help provide financial relief to small businesses hit by natural disasters, including low-interest loans to community facilities, water environmental programs, businesses and cooperatives and to rural utilities. More information can be found on the Rural Development Website or by contacting the State Offices..

Food Safety and Food Assistance

Severe weather forecasts often present the possibility of power outages that could compromise the safety of stored food. The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recommends that consumers take the necessary steps before, during, and after a power outage to reduce food waste and minimize the risk of foodborne illness. FSIS offers tips for keeping frozen and refrigerated food safe and a brochure that can be downloaded and printed for reference at home. If you have questions about the safety of food in your home, call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET or visit AskKaren.gov to chat live with a food safety specialist, available in English and Spanish.

Crop and Livestock Loss

The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) administers many safety-net programs to help producers recover from eligible losses, including the Livestock Indemnity Program, the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees and Farm –Raised Fish program, Emergency Forest Restoration Program,  and the Tree Assistance Program.  . The FSA Emergency Conservation Program provides funding and technical assistance for farmers and ranchers to rehabilitate farmland damaged by natural disasters. Producers located in counties that received a primary or contiguous disaster designation are eligible for low-interest emergency loans to help them recover from production and physical losses. Compensation also is available to producers who purchased coverage through the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program, which protects non-insurable crops against natural disasters that result in lower yields, crop losses or prevented planting. USDA encourages farmers and ranchers to contact their local FSA office to learn what documents can help the local office expedite assistance, such as farm records, receipts and pictures of damages or losses.

Producers with coverage through the RMA administered federal crop insurance program should contact their crop insurance agent. Those who purchased crop insurance will be paid for covered losses. Producers should report crop damage within 72 hours of damage discovery and follow up in writing within 15 days.

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